Latest American Heart Association Guidelines

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Every 5 years, guidelines for the delivery of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and AED use are updated by The American Heart Association (AHA) providing potential responders with amended treatment guidelines and the results of the most recent research behind cardiac care.

Download the AHA 2015 CPR and AED Guideline Highlights

For the full guideline update, we recommend downloading the Guideline Ebook via heart.org

Notable changes to the AHA Guidelines include:

Emphasis on Chest Compressions

2015 (Updated): Untrained lay rescuers should provide compression-only (Hands-Only) CPR, with or without dispatcher guidance, for adult victims of cardiac arrest. The rescuer should continue compression-only CPR until the arrival of an AED or rescuers with additional training. All lay rescuers should, at a minimum, provide chest compressions for victims of cardiac arrest. In addition, if the trained lay rescuer is able to perform rescue breaths, he or she should add rescue breaths in a ratio of 30 compressions to 2 breaths. The rescuer should continue CPR until an AED arrives and is ready for use, EMS providers take over care of the victim, or the victim starts to move.

2010 (Previous): If a bystander is not trained in CPR, the bystander should provide compression-only CPR for the adult victim who suddenly collapses, with an emphasis to “push hard and fast” on the center of the chest, or follow the directions of the EMS dispatcher. The rescuer should continue compression-only CPR until an AED arrives
and is ready for use or EMS providers take over care of the victim. All trained lay rescuers should, at a minimum, provide chest compressions for victims of cardiac arrest. In addition, if the trained lay rescuer is able to perform rescue breaths, compressions and breaths should be provided in a ratio of 30 compressions to 2 breaths. The rescuer should continue CPR until an AED arrives and is ready for use or EMS providers take over care of the victim.

 

Chest Compression Rate

2015 (Updated): In adult victims of cardiac arrest, it is reasonable for rescuers to perform chest compressions at a rate of 100 to 120/min.

2010 (Previous): It is reasonable for lay rescuers and HCPs to perform chest compressions at a rate of at least 100/min.

 

Chest Compression Depth

2015 (Updated): During manual CPR, rescuers should perform chest compressions to a depth of at least 2 inches (5 cm.) for an average adult, while avoiding excessive chest compressions depths (greater than 2.4 inches [6 cm.])

2010 (Previous)The adult sternum should be depressed at least 2 inches (5 cm.)

Community Lay Rescuer AED Programs

2015 (Updated): It is recommended that PAD programs for patients with OHCA be implemented in public locations where there is a relatively high likelihood of witnessed cardiac arrest (eg. airports, casinos, sports facilities).

2010 (Previous): CPR and the use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) by public safety first responders were recommended to increase survival rates for out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest. The 2010 Guidelines recommended the establishment of AED programs in public locations where there is a relatively high likelihood of witnessed cardiac arrest (eg. airports, casinos, sports facilities).

 

Chest Compression Rate: 100 to 120/min

2015 (Updated): In adult victims of cardiac arrest, it is reasonable for rescuers to perform chest compressions at a rate of 100 to 120/min.

2010 (Previous)It is reasonable for lay rescuers and HCPs to perform chest compressions at a rate of at least 100/min.

It is important to keep updated with the latest guidelines as set by the AHA to ensure the most effective care is provided to a victim of cardiac arrest.

Here at defibshop, we'll keep you regularly updated with any additional amendments to the American Heart Association's CPR and AED Guidelines, with the next update scheduled for 2020. As well as having the latest guide available on our website, you can follow us on Twitter @thedefibshop for daily updates to keep you in the know.

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